Who Knows....

tastefullyoffensive:

Disney Princess Avengers by ThinkingMakesItSo [via]

Previously: Disney Warrior Princesses

scientificvisuals:

thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.
I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.
(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

A great way to pick bones clean without harming them? Unleash the dermestid beetles, preferably the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus. They eat flesh.

scientificvisuals:

thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.

I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.

(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

A great way to pick bones clean without harming them? Unleash the dermestid beetles, preferably the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus. They eat flesh.

adreamwhileimawake:

i relate to this so much

twisteddoodles:

'If at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

twisteddoodles:

'If at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

hatteress:

"Women don’t like action, they skew towards romantic comedy and emotional drama. That’s just the way it is."

Using this argument is like feeding a lab mouse only cheddar cheese all it’s life and then saying it prefers the cheddar over the Gouda because reasons. No. No it doesn’t. That’s just all you’ve been giving it. You are a bad scientist. Hand in your goddamn coat and get the hell out of the lab.

passivemanipulations:

Project for my Social Psych class last semester. This poster series was created to 1) challenge these internalized stereotypes by bringing them to the viewer’s attention and 2) expand the range of role models by including a diverse group of women. Each poster follows the same basic pattern: a woman who has demonstrated her competency in a particular area refutes the stereotype that appears above her in the form of “Girls can’t …”. While the posters target girls ranging from children to young adults, I expect the message would also cause people outside that demographic to question their own beliefs about women and power.  I designed each aspect of the posters with several principles of social psychology in mind:

Peripheral route: When operating under the peripheral route, we judge persuasive appeal based on superficial characteristics such as attractiveness and credibility. I placed an attractive image of each woman over a black background, and the colors I chose complement each other well.  I hand-lettered the main text to give each poster a sense of artistry, using an easy-to-read, official looking font as the basis for my work.  Additionally, the women themselves are relatively well known.  Their accomplishments, listed in the short blurb at the bottom of each poster, are impressive as well as irrefutable.

Relevance: We are more likely to be persuaded when we can relate the argument back to ourselves.  These posters rely on the availability heuristic (since these stereotypes are readily available and common in society, media, and our own experiences) to establish an immediate relevancy.  The statement at the top is attention grabbing by its controversial nature alone.  However, it is also relevant to multiple groups, including but not limited to: 1) people who identify as girls, 2) people who have an opinion about girls, and 3) people who participate in the activity listed. I tried to include a wide range of activities (e.g., science, math, business, leadership, politics, athletics) and a diverse group of women (e.g., time period, nationality, ethnic background, age, area of expertise) to widen the range and appeal of the posters.  The use of the term “we” also serves to compound the relevancy effect towards the main target audience by establishing in-group membership.

Central route: Because of the blatant use of stereotypes and the establishment of relevancy, the viewer now has a motivation to pay attention.   Keeping the poster visually simple and limiting the biographical information helps by minimizing distractions.  The QR code in the corner gives the viewer the means to access more information, if desired.  Ideally, each QR code would link to the affiliated website (the URL would also be listed), but for now they link to relevant Wikipedia page.           

Reactance and negative potency: Because we are less likely to change our minds when we feel like someone is trying to persuade us, I avoided mentioning the groups who held these stereotypes, so as not to alienate them, and did not use American political figures.  I also did not attempt to convince girls to be more like the women portrayed. Additionally, because negative things are more potent than their positive counterparts, these posters run the risk of reinforcing the stereotype (“Girl’s can’t X”) rather than the counterargument (“Except we can”) or counterexample (the woman and her accomplishments).  To minimize this, I placed the counterargument phrase in a speech bubble, portraying the woman as having a voice and worthy of our attention.  I made the counterargument larger than any of the other text and placed it near the negative statement to provide an obvious, strong response.  In some posters, the woman’s statement even breaks up the stereotype.  I also colored the speech bubble and counterargument phrase, highlighting its difference from the preceding text as well as subtly raising its credibility through the color gold.

Attitude Inoculation: By exposing people to these stereotypes and providing notable counterexamples, these posters can potentially ‘vaccinate’ against the ubiquitous and persuasive sexism in our society.  Viewers could then use the provided information to make their own credible and persuasive appeals against the stereotypes.

Hi there! I have a question. I think you are a very smart and enthusiastic when it comes to stuff you do. So I have been wondering how do you keep up the "I can study all of this and I have enough energy" attitude? I am trying to be always enthusiastic (medical student) because I always loved science but lately I am kinda NAH i dont feel like learning new stuff anymore and I don´t know how to motivate myself. Any advice? thanks anyway:) and have a nice day!

ehmeegee:

You shouldn’t aspire to be always enthusiastic - it’s a state of being that is quite impossible to constantly maintain and is an unrealistic expectation for yourself, as detrimental as wanting to look like skinny beautiful photo-shopped celebrities or the images that fast food companies put out of their mouth-watering foods. The truth is, I get totally bummed out sometimes. My job can be draining, confusing, and demanding on occasion. I’m in a new city and I miss my friends, familiarity.  I spend weekends on my couch alone zoned out on reddit when I know I should be reading, researching, proactively doingI’m learning to accept that sometimes it’s completely okay to do nothing. Your body needs time to process what you’ve learned, to ingest the information, and most of all to contextualize it.

I can’t tell you how to motivate yourself because I don’t know you, but partially what motivates me is my own frustration. After a while I get frustrated that I’ve been doing nothing, dissatisfied with watching the world continue while I sit idly by, seeing events and discussions carrying on which I am ultimately then compelled to contribute to. And I pick myself up and rejoin the conversation, I meet someone to start a dialogue with, I begin participating in collaborations. I go outside. 

Don’t force yourself, and don’t feel guilty when you’re taking a break. You will last much longer if you don’t burn yourself out in the beginning. 

sagansense:

“Climate change isn’t the news and it isn’t a set of news stories. It’s the prospective end of all news. Think of it as the anti-news.

All the rest is part of the annals of human history: the rise and fall of empires, of movements, of dictatorships and democracies, of just about anything you want to mention. The most crucial stories, like the most faddish ones, are — every one of them — passing phenomena, which is of course what makes them the news.

What makes climate change so challenging is that the carbon dioxide (and methane) being generated by the extraction, production, and burning of fossil fuels supports the most profitable corporations in history, as well as energy states like Saudi Arabia and Russia that are, in essence, national versions of such corporations. The drive for profits has so far proven unstoppable. Those who run the big oil companies, like the tobacco companies before them, undoubtedly know what potential harm they are doing to us. They know what it will mean for humanity if resources (and profits) aren’t poured into alternative energy research and development. And like those cigarette companies, they go right on. They are indeed intent, for instance, on turning North America into “Saudi America,” and hunting down and extracting the last major reserves of fossil fuel in the most difficult spots on the planet. Their response to climate change has, in fact, been to put some of their vast profits into the funding of a campaign of climate-change denialism (and obfuscation) and into the coffers of chosen politicians and think tanks willing to lend a hand.

In fact, one of the grim wonders of climate change has been the ability of Big Energy and its lobbyists to politicize an issue that wouldn’t normally have a “left” or “right,” and to make bad science into an ongoing news story. In other words, an achievement that couldn’t be more criminal in nature has also been their great coup de théâtre.

In a world heading toward the brink, here’s the strange thing: most of the time that brink is nowhere in sight. And how can you get people together to solve a human-caused problem when it’s so seldom meaningfully in the news (and so regularly challenged by energy interests when it is)?

This is the road to hell and it has not been paved with good intentions. If we stay on it, we won’t even be able to say that future historians considered us both a wonder (for our ability to create world-ending scenarios and put them into effect) and a disgrace (for our inability to face what we had done). By then, humanity might have arrived at the end of history, and so of historians.

- Tom Engelhardt, “The End of History?”

Read all of this.

image sources: 1, 2

The goal of scientists is you hope that the thing you’re working on is bigger than the thing you’re pipetting into that tube at that moment.
Bonnie Bassler (via thatssoscience)